Blue Card Application Form (Blaue Karte EU) for Germany

1. What is the Blue Card and who is eligible to apply for it in Germany?

1. The Blue Card is a residence permit issued by the European Union that allows highly skilled non-EU citizens to live and work in Germany. To be eligible to apply for the Blue Card, individuals must meet certain criteria, including:

A. Holding a university degree or having equivalent qualifications
B. Having a job offer or an employment contract in Germany that meets specific salary requirements (as of 2021, the minimum salary for Blue Card holders in most professions is €56,800 per year)
C. Working in a job that corresponds to their qualifications

Overall, the Blue Card is designed to attract highly skilled workers to the EU, including Germany, and offers benefits such as easier family reunification, the possibility of permanent residency after a certain period, and the ability to move to another EU country after a certain time.

2. How do I fill out the Blue Card application form for Germany?

To fill out the Blue Card application form (Blaue Karte EU) for Germany, you will need to provide detailed information about yourself, your educational background, work experience, and the job offer you have in Germany. Here is a step-by-step guide on how to fill out the form:

1. Personal Information: Start by providing basic personal details such as your name, date of birth, nationality, and contact information.

2. Passport and Visa Details: Include information about your passport, visa, and any previous stays in Germany.

3. Academic and Professional Information: Provide details about your academic qualifications, including degrees obtained and relevant certifications. Also, list your previous work experience and any special skills or training that are relevant to the job offer.

4. Job Offer Details: You will need to include information about the job offer in Germany, such as the job title, company name, salary, and contract duration.

5. Declaration: Read through the declaration section carefully and sign where required to certify the accuracy of the information provided.

6. Additional Documents: Make sure to attach all required documents, such as a copy of your passport, CV, diplomas, and the job contract.

7. Submission: Once you have completed the form and gathered all necessary documents, you can submit your Blue Card application either in person at the relevant immigration office or online through the official portal.

It is essential to carefully review the form and ensure all information provided is accurate and up to date to avoid any delays in the processing of your Blue Card application.

3. What are the required documents for a Blue Card application in Germany?

The required documents for a Blue Card application in Germany typically include:

1. Valid passport: A valid passport with at least two empty pages for the visa sticker.
2. Signed Blue Card application form: The completed and signed application form for the Blue Card.
3. Proof of qualifying university degree: Such as a diploma or academic transcript from a recognized institution.
4. Employment contract: A binding job offer from a German employer with specific details on the salary and position.
5. Proof of previous work experience: Documentation showing previous work experience relevant to the job offer.
6. Health insurance: Confirmation of health insurance coverage for the duration of the stay in Germany.
7. Proof of accommodation: Evidence of where the applicant will be residing in Germany.
8. Biometric photos: Recent passport-sized photos meeting specific requirements.

It is important to note that additional documents may be required depending on individual circumstances and the specific requirements of the German authorities processing the Blue Card application. It is recommended to consult the official website of the German consulate or embassy for the most up-to-date and accurate information.

4. Can I apply for a Blue Card in Germany if I am already residing in another EU country?

Yes, you can apply for a Blue Card in Germany if you are already residing in another EU country under certain conditions:
1. You must hold a valid residence permit in the EU country where you currently reside.
2. You must meet the eligibility criteria for the Blue Card, including having a job offer in Germany that meets the minimum salary requirements.
3. You may need to apply for the Blue Card from your home country or the country where you currently reside, depending on your specific situation and the regulations in place.
4. It is advisable to consult with the German authorities or a legal expert specializing in immigration to ensure a smooth application process.

5. Is there a deadline for submitting a Blue Card application in Germany?

Yes, there is no specified deadline for submitting a Blue Card application in Germany. Applicants can apply for a Blue Card at any time throughout the year, provided they meet all the eligibility requirements and have the necessary documents ready for submission. However, it is recommended to apply as early as possible to allow for processing time and to ensure all requirements are met. It is important to note that the processing time for Blue Card applications can vary, so it is advisable to plan accordingly and submit the application well in advance of the intended start date of employment in Germany.

6. How long does the Blue Card application process typically take in Germany?

The Blue Card application process in Germany typically takes around 1 to 3 months to be processed. However, the exact timeframe may vary depending on various factors such as the volume of applications being processed, the applicant’s individual case, and the workload of the relevant immigration authorities. It is important to note that delays can occur if any additional documents or information are required or if there are any issues with the application that need to be resolved. Overall, it is advisable for applicants to submit their Blue Card application well in advance to account for any potential delays in the processing time.

7. What are the eligibility criteria for the Blue Card in terms of education and work experience?

To be eligible for a Blue Card in Germany, an applicant must meet specific criteria related to education and work experience:

1. Educational Qualifications: The applicant must have a university degree or equivalent qualification from a recognized educational institution. The degree must be in a field that is in demand in Germany, such as science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) disciplines.

2. Work Experience: In addition to the educational requirement, the applicant must typically have at least five years of professional experience in the relevant field. However, this requirement may be lowered to three years if the applicant has a job offer in a profession with a labor shortage in Germany.

Overall, the Blue Card is designed to attract highly skilled professionals to Germany, so meeting the educational and work experience criteria is essential for securing this residence and work permit. Applicants who meet these requirements may benefit from faster and more straightforward immigration processes compared to other types of residence permits.

8. Are there any language requirements for the Blue Card application in Germany?

1. Yes, there are language requirements for the Blue Card application in Germany. One of the main requirements is proof of German language proficiency. This can be demonstrated through various means such as providing a language certificate from recognized institutions like Goethe Institute or Telc, or by showing that you have completed a certain level of German language courses. The level of proficiency required may vary depending on the specific job or industry you are applying for, but having at least basic to intermediate German language skills is usually necessary.

2. Additionally, certain professions or fields may have specific language requirements beyond just German. For example, if you are working in a specialized field that requires English proficiency, you may need to provide evidence of your proficiency in English as well.

3. It’s important to check the specific language requirements for your particular situation and make sure you have the necessary documentation to prove your language skills when submitting your Blue Card application in Germany. Failure to meet the language requirements could result in delays or even rejection of your application.

9. Can I bring my family with me to Germany on a Blue Card?

Yes, as a Blue Card holder in Germany, you can bring your family members with you. Family members eligible to accompany you include your spouse, registered partner, and children under 18 years old. To bring your family members, you will need to demonstrate that you have suitable accommodation and sufficient financial resources to support them. Moreover, your family members may also be required to obtain their own residence permits to live in Germany. It’s important to note that the rights and privileges granted to family members may depend on their relationship to you and their own qualifications. Additionally, transitioning your family to Germany on a Blue Card may require understanding and fulfilling specific requirements set by German immigration authorities.

10. What are the benefits of holding a Blue Card in Germany compared to other types of residence permits?

1. One of the key benefits of holding a Blue Card in Germany is that it allows highly skilled non-EU citizens to live and work in the country more easily compared to other types of residence permits. The Blue Card is specifically designed for skilled professionals, making it a preferred option for individuals looking to pursue career opportunities in Germany.

2. Another advantage of the Blue Card is that it offers a faster path to permanent residency in Germany. Holders of the Blue Card can apply for a permanent settlement permit after 33 months if they have sufficient German language skills, or after 21 months if they can prove a higher level of integration, compared to the general 5-year requirement for other types of residence permits.

3. Additionally, the Blue Card allows for easier mobility within the European Union. After holding a Blue Card in Germany for 18 months, individuals can move to another EU country and apply for a Blue Card there, facilitating mobility across EU member states for highly skilled professionals.

4. Furthermore, Blue Card holders enjoy certain benefits such as the ability to bring family members to Germany and access to social security benefits, making it a comprehensive and attractive option for those seeking to establish themselves in the country.

Overall, the Blue Card offers a streamlined and advantageous pathway for highly skilled professionals to live and work in Germany, with benefits including faster access to permanent residency, mobility within the EU, and family reunification rights.

11. Can I switch jobs while holding a Blue Card in Germany?

If you hold a Blue Card in Germany, you are permitted to switch jobs after a certain period of time and under certain conditions. Here are some key points to consider:

1. Minimum Employment Period: Typically, you are required to work in your initial position for at least 33 months before switching jobs. However, if you have reached level B1 in German language proficiency, this period may be reduced to 21 months.

2. Job Change Process: To switch jobs, you need to notify the relevant immigration authorities of your intention to change employment. Additionally, the new job must meet the Blue Card salary threshold and other eligibility criteria.

3. Visa Renewal: Upon changing jobs, you may need to apply for a new Blue Card or have your existing one amended to reflect your new employment details.

4. Ruling on Job Change: It’s important to adhere to the regulations and seek guidance from the local Foreigners’ Office or immigration authorities to ensure compliance with the Blue Card regulations when switching jobs.

In summary, while it is possible to switch jobs while holding a Blue Card in Germany, there are specific conditions and procedures that must be followed to ensure a smooth transition and maintain your legal status in the country.

12. Do I need to provide proof of health insurance coverage when applying for a Blue Card in Germany?

Yes, when applying for a Blue Card in Germany, you are required to provide proof of health insurance coverage. This is a mandatory requirement to ensure that you have adequate health insurance while residing in Germany. The health insurance coverage needs to meet specific criteria set by the German authorities, including coverage for medical treatment, hospitalization, and repatriation in case of emergency. Without proof of health insurance, your Blue Card application may be rejected. It is important to have a comprehensive health insurance plan in place before applying for the Blue Card to fulfill this requirement.

13. Is there a minimum salary requirement for obtaining a Blue Card in Germany?

Yes, there is a minimum salary requirement for obtaining a Blue Card in Germany. As of 2021, the minimum gross annual salary for highly qualified professionals in fields such as mathematics, IT, natural sciences, engineering, and human medicine is set at €56,800. However, for professionals in shortage occupations like doctors, engineers, and IT specialists, the minimum salary requirement is €44,304 per year. It is important to note that these salary thresholds may vary depending on the specific job position, qualifications of the applicant, and other factors such as work experience. Additionally, the minimum salary requirements are updated annually based on the average income in Germany. Meeting the minimum salary requirement is crucial for the successful application of a Blue Card as it demonstrates that the applicant will be adequately remunerated in Germany.

14. Can I apply for permanent residency in Germany after holding a Blue Card for a certain period of time?

Yes, holders of the Blue Card in Germany can apply for permanent residency after holding the Blue Card for a certain period of time. The requirements for obtaining permanent residency through the Blue Card scheme include:

1. Typically, you must have held a Blue Card for at least 33 months.
2. If you can prove a sufficient level of German language proficiency (B1 level), you may be eligible to apply for permanent residency after 21 months.
3. You should not have received any social benefits during your time in Germany.
4. You must have a valid passport and secure means of income.

After fulfilling these requirements, you can apply for permanent residency in Germany, which grants you long-term residency rights and the ability to work and live in the country indefinitely.

15. What is the validity period of a Blue Card in Germany?

The validity period of a Blue Card in Germany is typically four years. However, there are certain cases where the card may be issued for a shorter duration, such as when the employment contract is for a shorter period of time. Additionally, if the employment contract is shorter than four years but exceeds one year, the Blue Card will be issued for the duration of the contract plus three months. It is essential for Blue Card holders to be aware of the validity period of their card so they can plan for any necessary renewals in a timely manner to maintain their legal status in Germany.

16. Can I apply for German citizenship after holding a Blue Card?

Yes, you can apply for German citizenship after holding a Blue Card, but there are certain requirements that need to be met before you can apply for naturalization. Here are some key points to consider:

1. Residency: You must have lived in Germany for a certain period of time before being eligible to apply for citizenship. This period is usually 8 years, but it can be reduced to 7 years if you successfully complete an integration course or 6 years if you have shown exceptional integration efforts.

2. Language skills: You must demonstrate a certain level of proficiency in the German language. This is typically proven by passing the “Einbürgerungstest,” an exam that tests your knowledge of the German language and society.

3. Financial stability: You should have a stable income and be able to support yourself and any dependents without relying on social welfare benefits.

4. Clean criminal record: You must have a clean criminal record to be eligible for German citizenship.

Once you meet these requirements and have held a Blue Card for a certain period of time, you can apply for German citizenship through the naturalization process. It’s important to note that each case is unique, and it’s always advisable to seek guidance from legal experts or immigration authorities for personalized advice.

17. Are there any additional fees associated with the Blue Card application process in Germany?

Yes, there are additional fees associated with the Blue Card application process in Germany. The main fees include:

1. Processing fee: There is a processing fee that needs to be paid when submitting the Blue Card application. As of the time of writing, the fee is around 140 euros.

2. Residence permit fee: Once the Blue Card application is approved, there is a fee for issuing the actual residence permit. This fee varies depending on the duration of the permit and can range from 100 to 110 euros.

3. Biometric data fee: If you need to provide biometric data (such as fingerprints) as part of the application process, there may be an additional fee for this service.

It’s important to check the current fee amounts and any updates to the fee schedule on the official website of the German authorities responsible for issuing the Blue Card to ensure you have the most accurate information.

18. What should I do if my Blue Card application is rejected in Germany?

If your Blue Card application is rejected in Germany, there are several steps you can take to address the situation:

1. Understand the reasons for rejection: Request detailed information from the immigration authorities on why your application was rejected. This will help you identify any errors or missing documents that may have led to the rejection.

2. Consider an appeal: In most cases, you have the right to appeal the decision within one month of receiving the rejection notice. Consult with an immigration lawyer or advisor to help you prepare a strong appeal with additional evidence to support your case.

3. Correct any mistakes: If the rejection was due to missing or incorrect documents, make sure to rectify these errors before submitting your appeal or reapplying for the Blue Card.

4. Seek professional assistance: Immigration laws and procedures can be complex, so consider seeking assistance from a legal expert specializing in immigration matters. They can provide guidance on the best course of action to take in your specific case.

5. Explore alternative options: If your Blue Card application is rejected, you may still be eligible for other types of residence permits in Germany. A professional advisor can help you explore alternative pathways for legal residency in the country.

Overall, it is crucial to carefully review the rejection reasons, seek expert guidance, and take appropriate steps to address the issue in a timely and comprehensive manner.

19. Can I work in other EU countries with a Blue Card issued by Germany?

Yes, you can work in other EU countries with a Blue Card issued by Germany. Here are some key points to consider:

1. Portability: The Blue Card allows high-skilled non-EU citizens to work and live in Germany, but it also grants certain rights for mobility within the European Union.

2. Immediate benefits: After having a Blue Card in Germany for 18 months, you can move to another EU country for employment without losing your Blue Card status.

3. Conditions: However, certain conditions apply, such as showing that you have a job offer or are planning to look for work upon arrival in the new EU country.

4. Recognition: Your qualifications and the duration of your Blue Card status will also be recognized by the new EU country to facilitate your working rights there.

5. Renewal: It’s important to keep in mind that each country may have slightly different rules and procedures for Blue Card holders, so it’s advisable to check specific requirements in the country you intend to work in.

20. Are there any changes or updates to the Blue Card application process that I should be aware of in Germany?

As of the latest information available, there have been no major changes to the Blue Card application process in Germany. However, it is always advisable to double-check the specific requirements and procedures on the official website of the Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF) to ensure you have the most up-to-date information. It is also recommended to consult with a legal expert or immigration advisor to navigate the application process smoothly. Some key points to be aware of when applying for a Blue Card in Germany include:

1. Eligibility criteria: Ensure that you meet all the eligibility requirements, including having a recognized university degree, a valid job offer with a specified salary threshold, and sufficient health insurance coverage.

2. Document preparation: Make sure to gather all the necessary documents, such as your passport, CV, qualifications, and proof of employment, and have them translated into German or English if required.

3. Language proficiency: While not mandatory for the Blue Card application, having a good command of the German language can be beneficial for your integration into the German society and job market.

4. Processing times: Be aware that the processing times for Blue Card applications can vary, so it is advisable to submit your application well in advance of your intended start date.

Keeping yourself informed about any potential updates or changes to the Blue Card application process will help you navigate the system more effectively and increase your chances of a successful application.