Form 1229 – Consent form to grant an Australian visa to a child under the age of 18 years

1. What is Form 1229?

Form 1229 is a crucial document required by the Australian Department of Home Affairs when a child under the age of 18 is applying for an Australian visa and is travelling without one or both of their parents or legal guardians. This form serves as a consent from the non-travelling parent or guardian, granting permission for the child to travel to Australia. By completing Form 1229, the non-travelling parent or guardian acknowledges and approves the child’s visa application and confirms their awareness of the travel arrangements. This form is essential in ensuring the safety and well-being of the child during their stay in Australia. Failure to submit a completed Form 1229 can result in delays or even refusal of the child’s visa application. It is important for all relevant parties involved to carefully read and understand the contents of Form 1229 before signing and submitting it.

2. Who needs to complete Form 1229?

Form 1229, also known as the Consent form to grant an Australian visa to a child under the age of 18 years, needs to be completed by certain individuals in specific circumstances. Here’s who needs to complete the form:

1. Both Parents: If the child is under 18 years of age and is applying for an Australian visa, both parents or legal guardians are typically required to complete Form 1229. This ensures that both parents consent to the child’s visa application and the travel plans involved.

2. Legal Guardian: In cases where one or both parents are not available or have legal restrictions that prevent them from providing consent, a legal guardian or another responsible adult may need to complete the form instead.

It’s essential for all parties involved in a child’s visa application process to adhere to the requirements outlined in Form 1229 to ensure the child’s welfare and compliance with Australian immigration laws.

3. What is the purpose of Form 1229?

The purpose of Form 1229 is to provide consent from the individuals or entities with legal responsibility for a child under the age of 18 years who is applying for an Australian visa. By completing this form, the person or persons with legal responsibility confirm their consent for the child to travel to Australia and be granted a visa. This form is crucial in ensuring that the child’s best interests are being considered and that appropriate consent is provided by the individuals who have authority over the child’s travel and visa application process. Failure to submit a completed Form 1229 may result in delays or even the refusal of the child’s visa application. It is a mandatory requirement for certain visa applications involving minors and plays a vital role in safeguarding the welfare and rights of children traveling to Australia.

4. Does both parents/guardians need to complete Form 1229?

Yes, both parents or legal guardians are typically required to complete Form 1229 when applying for an Australian visa for a child under the age of 18 years. This form is used to provide consent for the child to travel to Australia and to grant the visa. By completing this form, both parents or guardians are acknowledging and agreeing to the travel arrangements for the child. It is important for both parties to provide accurate and honest information on the form to ensure the visa application process goes smoothly and to avoid any complications or delays. Additionally, both parents or guardians should sign the form to indicate their consent and agreement to the terms outlined.

5. Can a single parent/guardian complete Form 1229?

Yes, a single parent or guardian can complete Form 1229 to grant an Australian visa to a child under the age of 18 years. When completing this form as a single parent or guardian, it is essential to provide accurate and detailed information about the child’s circumstances and arrangements. Additionally, the single parent or guardian should ensure that they have the legal authority to make decisions on behalf of the child regarding immigration matters. It is important to note that the consent of both parents or relevant guardians is typically required for visa applications involving a child, so the single parent or guardian may need to provide additional documentation or information to support their application.

6. How should Form 1229 be completed and submitted?

Form 1229, the Consent form to grant an Australian visa to a child under the age of 18 years, should be completed thoroughly and accurately to ensure the proper assessment and processing of the visa application. Here is how the form should be completed and submitted:

1. Details of the applicant child: The form should include the full name, date of birth, and passport details of the child applying for the visa.

2. Parental details: The details of both parents or legal guardians should be provided, including their full names, relationship to the child, contact information, and signatures.

3. Consent: Both parents or legal guardians must provide their consent for the child to be granted an Australian visa. This consent should be clearly stated and signed on the form.

4. Supporting documents: Any additional supporting documents required, such as birth certificates, identification documents, or proof of guardianship, should be attached to the form.

5. Submission: Once the form is completed, signed, and all relevant documents are attached, it should be submitted along with the child’s visa application to the appropriate Australian visa office or department.

6. Submission methods: The completed Form 1229 can be submitted either electronically through the ImmiAccount system (if applying online) or in person at a Visa Application Centre or Australian visa office.

By following these steps and ensuring the form is completed accurately and submitted correctly, parents or legal guardians can help facilitate the visa application process for a child under the age of 18 years.

7. When is Form 1229 required to be submitted?

Form 1229, the Consent form to grant an Australian visa to a child under the age of 18 years, is required to be submitted in specific circumstances relating to the visa application process for a minor. This form is mandatory when a child is applying for an Australian visa and is under the age of 18 years. The form must be completed and signed by each person who has a legal right to decide where the child lives and who has a responsibility for the child’s long-term welfare. Additionally, the form must be submitted along with the visa application for the child to demonstrate that consent has been given by the appropriate parties for the child to travel to Australia.

1. It is important to note that if the necessary Form 1229 is not submitted with the visa application, the application may be delayed or even refused. Therefore, it is crucial for parents or legal guardians to carefully complete this form and ensure all relevant details are accurately provided. Failure to comply with this requirement could result in significant consequences for the visa application process for the child under 18 years of age.

8. Are there any specific requirements for completing Form 1229?

Yes, there are specific requirements for completing Form 1229 to grant an Australian visa to a child under the age of 18 years:

1. The form must be filled out by all individuals who have a legal right to decide where the child under 18 will live during their stay in Australia, such as both parents or legal guardians.

2. Each person completing the form must provide their full name, address, date of birth, contact details, and relationship to the child.

3. Signatures from all individuals completing the form are required to confirm consent for the child to travel to Australia and stay there for the specified period.

4. The form must be completed in English. If the individual completing the form does not speak English, a certified translation should be provided.

5. Copies of identification documents, such as passports or birth certificates, for both the child and the person completing the form need to be attached to the application.

6. The form should be submitted along with the visa application for the child.

7. It is important to ensure that all information provided on Form 1229 is accurate and up-to-date to avoid any delays or complications in the visa application process.

9. What information needs to be included in Form 1229?

Form 1229, the Consent form to grant an Australian visa to a child under the age of 18 years, is a crucial document that must be completed accurately and comprehensively. When filling out this form, several key pieces of information need to be included:

1. Full details of the child for whom the visa is being sought, including their name, date of birth, and passport number.
2. The details of the parents or legal guardian providing consent, including their full name, relationship to the child, and contact information.
3. Information about the visa being applied for, such as the subclass and the purpose of the visit.
4. Confirmation of consent from all individuals with parental responsibility for the child, including signatures and dates.
5. Any additional information or circumstances that may be relevant to the visa application or the child’s welfare.

It is essential to carefully review the form and ensure that all required information is accurately provided to avoid delays or complications in the visa process.

10. Can Form 1229 be submitted electronically?

Yes, Form 1229 can be submitted electronically for certain visa applications in Australia. When lodging an application online through the Department of Home Affairs’ ImmiAccount portal, there is an option to attach supporting documents electronically, including Form 1229. However, it is essential to ensure that the electronic submission meets all the necessary requirements and is in the accepted format. It is recommended to carefully follow the instructions provided by the Department of Home Affairs to ensure the form is correctly submitted.

11. Can Form 1229 be submitted after the visa application has been lodged?

1. Yes, Form 1229 can be submitted after the visa application has been lodged. While it is generally recommended to submit all required documents, including Form 1229, at the time of lodging the visa application to avoid delays in processing, there are circumstances where it may not be possible to submit the form along with the initial application.

2. In situations where the child’s circumstances change, or additional information or consent is required after the visa application has been lodged, Form 1229 can be submitted separately at a later stage. The Department of Home Affairs allows for the submission of additional documents or information to support the visa application even after it has been lodged.

3. However, it is advisable to inform the department as soon as possible if there are any changes or additional information to be provided to avoid any potential complications or processing delays. Additionally, the submission of Form 1229 after the visa application has been lodged should be done in a timely manner to ensure that the application is processed efficiently and in accordance with the relevant requirements.

12. What are the consequences of not submitting Form 1229?

1. The consequences of not submitting Form 1229, which is a crucial document for granting an Australian visa to a child under the age of 18 years, are significant and can directly impact the visa application process.

2. Firstly, not submitting Form 1229 may result in delays or even the rejection of the visa application for the child. This form serves as a consent document from the custodial parent or legal guardian, allowing the child to travel to Australia and stay there temporarily. Without this form, the Australian immigration authorities may not have the necessary assurance that the child has permission to travel and stay in the country.

3. Moreover, failing to submit Form 1229 can raise concerns about the welfare and protection of the child. This form includes important information about the child’s accommodation, financial support, and general welfare arrangements while in Australia. Without this document, the authorities may question the suitability of the travel arrangements for the child, which can hinder the visa approval process.

4. In summary, not submitting Form 1229 can lead to delays, visa rejection, and concerns regarding the child’s welfare during their stay in Australia. It is essential for parents and guardians to complete and submit this form accurately and promptly to ensure a smooth visa application process for the child.

13. Can Form 1229 be waived in certain circumstances?

Yes, Form 1229 can be waived in certain circumstances. The Department of Home Affairs may consider waiving the requirement for Form 1229 in cases where it is not reasonably practicable for a parent or legal guardian to provide consent for a child under the age of 18 to be granted an Australian visa. Some circumstances where a waiver may be considered include:

1. In cases where a parent or legal guardian is deceased or incapacitated and therefore unable to give consent.
2. When there is a history of family violence or abuse which may put the child at risk if the consent form is signed.
3. If the parent or legal guardian is estranged from the child and cannot be located or contacted to provide consent.

In such cases, the Department of Home Affairs will assess the individual circumstances and may grant a waiver of Form 1229 if it is deemed appropriate to do so in the best interests of the child’s welfare and safety.

14. Can Form 1229 be used for multiple visa applications for the same child?

Yes, Form 1229 can be used for multiple visa applications for the same child. When a parent or guardian grants consent for a child under the age of 18 to apply for an Australian visa through Form 1229, this consent is typically not limited to a single visa application. The form is designed to provide ongoing permission for visa applications for the child, so it can be used for multiple applications as long as the circumstances and details remain consistent. It is important to ensure the information provided in each application aligns with the consent granted in Form 1229 to avoid any discrepancies or issues with the visa process.

15. Can Form 1229 be used for visa applications for multiple children?

Yes, Form 1229 can be used for visa applications for multiple children. Each child must have a separate Form 1229 completed and signed by their respective parents or legal guardians. This form is required to provide consent for the child to be granted an Australian visa and outlines the arrangements for the child’s welfare, accommodation, and support while in Australia. It is important that each child’s form is accurate and complete to avoid any delays or complications in the visa application process. Following the guidelines and requirements for each child’s Form 1229 will help ensure a smooth visa application process for multiple children.

16. Can Form 1229 be used for different types of Australian visas?

Yes, Form 1229 can be used for different types of Australian visas where consent is required for a child under the age of 18 years. This form is specifically designed for situations where a child is applying for an Australian visa and one or both parents or legal guardians are not included in the application. For instance:

1. Student visas: If a child is applying for a student visa to study in Australia and one or both parents are not accompanying them, Form 1229 can be used to provide consent for their travel and stay in Australia.

2. Visitor visas: For children applying for visitor visas to visit family members or for tourism purposes, Form 1229 can be utilized to show consent from the absent parent or guardian.

3. Dependent visas: In cases where a child is applying for a dependent visa to join a family member who is already in Australia, Form 1229 can be completed by the parent or guardian not included in the application to grant consent.

Form 1229 ensures that all relevant parties acknowledge and consent to the child’s visa application and travel arrangements, providing the Australian authorities with the necessary assurances regarding the child’s welfare and the consent of all concerned parties.

17. Do grandparents or other relatives need to complete Form 1229?

Grandparents or other relatives typically do not need to complete Form 1229 for an Australian visa application for a child under the age of 18. Form 1229 is specifically designed for the child’s parent or legal guardian to grant consent for the child to travel to Australia and be granted a visa. However, in some cases where the child is not traveling with their parent or legal guardian, additional documentation such as a statutory declaration from the non-accompanying parent or legal guardian may be required to demonstrate consent for the child to travel. It is important to carefully review the specific visa requirements and consult with the Australian Department of Home Affairs or a qualified immigration professional to determine the necessary documentation for a child visa application.

18. Can Form 1229 be completed by a legal guardian or other authorized individual?

Yes, Form 1229 can be completed by a legal guardian or another authorized individual on behalf of the child under the age of 18 years who is applying for an Australian visa. The form serves as a consent declaration for visa applications for minor children and requires the signature of a parent, legal guardian, or a person who has the legal right to make decisions on behalf of the child. It is crucial for the person completing the form to provide accurate and honest information to support the visa application process for the child. Failure to do so may result in delays or even a rejection of the visa application. Therefore, it is essential for the authorized individual completing Form 1229 to carefully read and understand the requirements before filling it out.

19. Can Form 1229 be revoked or amended once submitted?

Once Form 1229 has been submitted to the Department of Home Affairs, it is generally not possible to revoke or amend the form. This is because Form 1229 is a legally binding document that signifies the consent of the parent or guardian for the child to travel to or remain in Australia. Making changes to the form after submission could compromise the integrity of the visa application process and may lead to complications in the visa assessment. It is crucial for parents or guardians to carefully review and accurately complete Form 1229 before submitting it, as any inaccuracies or omissions could result in delays or refusals of the visa application. If there is a need to make any changes or corrections to the information provided in Form 1229, it is advisable to contact the Department of Home Affairs as soon as possible to seek guidance on how to proceed.

20. Are there any additional considerations for completing Form 1229 for special circumstances, such as sole custody or legal guardianship issues?

Yes, there are additional considerations for completing Form 1229 for special circumstances like sole custody or legal guardianship issues when applying for an Australian visa for a child under 18 years of age. In cases of sole custody, the parent with sole custody must provide detailed information regarding the circumstances of the custody arrangement and include any relevant legal documentation to support their claim. It is important to clearly outline how decisions regarding the child’s care, welfare, and development are made in the absence of the other parent.

In situations of legal guardianship, the legal guardian must provide proof of their legal status as the child’s guardian and demonstrate that they have the authority to make decisions on behalf of the child. This may involve submitting court orders or other official documents that establish the guardian’s rights and responsibilities regarding the child.

It is crucial to provide accurate and complete information on Form 1229 in such special circumstances to avoid any delays or complications in the visa application process. Additionally, seeking legal advice or guidance from a professional specializing in immigration law can be beneficial in ensuring that all necessary documentation and information are properly submitted.